Commercial Print Modeling Vs Editorial Print Modeling

When you think or hear of the word “commercial” in regards to the modeling industry, there are a few variations of the meaning, but in the most practical form regarding “print” photography think of the word “promote”. The model’s job is to be photographed “promoting” a product or service in a print ad (for example… in magazines, brochures, newspapers, catalogues, etc.). There are numerous opportunities for COMMERCIAL PRINT MODELS that exist all over the United States and internationally. The ad may range from the smallest business promoting its’ livelihood all the way to large corporations who can afford their own advertising agencies to handle marketing campaigns.

Commercial Print Modeling is very different from Editorial Print Modeling. Remember that an “editorial” is a magazine fashion “story” of the trend that is happening at that particular moment, not a specific advertisement for any one company, even though you will see multiple credits cited in small print of the stores and designers of the featured garments and accessories. Some ads that you may see in magazines may be elaborately spread out and photographed in an “editorial-style”, but it is ultimately a “commercial” ad if it is promoting one company name. It makes a nifty, high fashion looking ad, though, because that is the style ad that they are marketing to their specific consumers.

Usually, though, the editorial model and their style of modeling don’t represent the particular looks that can be marketed to a large group of average, “every-day” consumers (a.k.a. the people who buy). Consumers buy from ads that they can relate to or strive to achieve. This is where a commercial model may have a wonderful chance of success because their image is a part of the marketing process that sells to the consumer. They represent a highly approachable and marketable look. So, for whatever product they are promoting their look can vary dependent upon what product or service is being advertised to the consumer. That means the door is open to many different types and sizes of models. Take note, that there are actually some editorial fashion models that are able to cross over from editorial modeling into the diverse commercial advertising side. That’s so ideal for a career model who wants longevity. The commercial model doesn’t usually have just one look even though there may be one special look that gets them hired over and over.

This is where the terminology variations form and can cause confusion to whether a model is considered an editorial-type or commercial-type of model. Remember the prestige title? It’s placed on editorial models, but there is something wonderful to be said for being a successful working commercial model, too. “Commercial” is a term that the general public thinks of as ads that they see on television or hear on the radio. The terminology used by an advertising agency versus a modeling agency when referring to “commercial” has different degrees of meanings, too, depending on how they interpret the booking.

Being in a television commercial is one type of opportunity that can use commercial models, but it’s “NOT” why they are called commercial models. For the purposes of a commercial type of model, the doors are open for almost anyone who has the skills of being either photogenic for photographs or having the right personality and approachable looks for promoting a product. The range of model can vary from being very outwardly attractive all the way to people who possess a great “character” face and /or personality (a.k.a. character model). Fashion does have its place for commercial models (a.k.a. commercial fashion models) by selling the garments or accessories that are being advertised in catalogues, showrooms, and certain ads in magazines (not the editorial stories).

The context of explaining where the “commercial model” terms are used may vary depending on whom is referring to the booking… an Advertising Agency, a Commercial Modeling Agency, or a “specialized” Editorial Fashion Agency. Advertising Agencies (a.k.a. Ad Agencies) are hired on behalf of a company who wants their product or service promoted. Ad agencies will overall take charge of how the product or service will be promoted and will usually take care of hiring all of the personnel needed to complete the job such as photographers and models, too. If the campaign is something to promote a “fashion” product, then the “ad” agency refers to this as a “fashion” job. This is where the slight confusion of terms is just a technicality. An “Editorial ” modeling agency does not refer to such “fashion” work as “editorial” and will likely view the ad as commercial. So, here you have the advertising agency’s viewpoint booking a “fashion model”, but perhaps the modeling agency refers to what the ad agency is booking in terms of a commercial model. Ultimately, someone is used, so congrats to whatever type of model gets the job. Commercial Fashion Print bookings for models represent a lot of work around the world, too, as well as the high fashion modeling. The demand for catalog models varies from city to city just as the prestige of work does.

Even though “Prestige” is usually a term that is used for the editorial model bookings, there is a rare level of “exception” for the commercial models who are working for the “big” clients in fashion, too. Upscale catalogues, beauty clients, fashion clients, and department stores using the “combination” fashion and commercial models for their print work offer opportunities, too, that is different from the fashion editorial stories. It’s all about high-end advertising! There are some rare, “dual-type” models that can be in possibly the same types of magazines for their “commercial” fashion ad that their “editorial” fashion story would be in. These companies want to showcase their product and company name with a great deal of effective, up-scale representation, so the bottom line is “investing” in their ability to make money. Booking models is an investment of their money that they pay the ad agency (or modeling agency) directly, so the ability to have the right model representing the company’s “look” to their market that they are trying to reach is essential. The “prestige” in a commercial fashion print opportunity is usually associated with either the upscale client, usage of photographs, or the amount of money paid to the commercial model.

Commercial print models appear in magazine ads, newspapers, newspaper fliers/inserts, brochures, school text books, catalogues, billboards, Internet ads, hang tags, food packaging, and numerous other product pictures (too many to list all). We mentioned earlier that there is flexibility in the model’s appearance and even size. The requirements aren’t as strict as the editorial fashion model regarding height, weight, and body measurements, but the model hired for a commercial print job is required to fill the shoes of whatever “character” that they have been hired to portray in front of the camera. The character is usually booked according to the model that suits the role closest such as “young mom”, “middle-aged pilot”, “corporate executive”, “young nurse”, “college student”, etc. The company or advertising agency has its own idea of how they want their product or service represented, so the model must “look” and “project” the part to the client and photographer. This involves acting. The younger model is unlikely an experienced or trained actor, but modeling is a version of role-playing, so acting is a personal trait that can improve the model’s ability to get into character. Actors compete for these jobs, as well, in commercial print, so it’s not just for career models. Everyone wants the work. Commercial print modeling may or may not be a full-time career choice as compared to the editorial fashion model’s often hectic schedule.

Flexibility in a model’s availability is also a key requirement to getting the work when jobs are available, too. Some bookings are literally made at the “last minute” when clients need someone a.s.a.p. for “whatever” reason they may find (a model never showed up, a model needs to be replaced, etc.) There are often a team of people relying on “everyone” to do their job and show up on time. Time is something that is paid for and a model should never assume that being even five to fifteen minutes late is acceptable. This is not a social situation, but rather a professional, paying job. Being a little early is well worth the experience of not frustrating a team of creative individuals and allowing you some breathing time to get into character! Being on time shouldn’t be considered as showing up at the exact moment that the job is officially starting. It is implied that you should know to be a little early to catch yourself up with any required information, extra preparation, or updates to what is going on for that booking. Your mind should be open to whatever character that you will be portraying and how you may best show whatever product or implied service via your poses and any props.

Clothing may not always be provided by the client…surprise! You don’t want to find that out too late, either! This is part of the commercial modeling industry where you may provide the “props” such as clothing, shoes, eye glasses, jewelry, etc. You may even be required to put on your own make-up and do your own hairstyle. It’s not as glamorous as the general public perceives, huh? It all depends on the budget of the client, so you must be aware of this BEFORE you show up for the booking. Always get as much information from the agency when booking your schedule about any special considerations. It never hurts to check up on a potential client before a go-see, either, to learn what it is that they do if you are unfamiliar with them. Whatever gives you information that can help you get the job or be prepared to do the job even better is smart. (a.k.a. “a smart model”)



Source by Carol Anne Blackwell

Rent – A Musical Which Deals With Sensitive Issues

‘Rent’ is a musical which has been immensely popular and is running for its eleventh year now. It is based on the Opera La Boheme by Giacomo Puccini. ‘Rent’ is set to become the second longest running show currently in Broadway when ‘Beauty and the Beast’ ends its run on July 29, 2007.

‘Rent’ was one of the first musicals to treat subjects like homosexuality, transsexuals and AIDS. It is a rock musical with an enduring look at the lives of several characters living in the East Side. These characters struggle to survive the harsh realities of their lives. Jonathan Larson wrote the book for Broadway and he also wrote the lyrics and composed the music. Unfortunately he died before he was able to see the success of his play.

The story of ‘Rent’ deals with the lives of several characters. We see Mark Cohen, a film maker and also the narrator of the story and Roger Davis, a musician who shares the Rent with Mark. Mark has just lost his girlfriend Maureen to another woman Joanne. Mimi is a dancer and who falls in love with Roger. Other characters include Angel, who is a gay cross dressing drummer, and Tom Collins who is also gay, a philosophy teacher and Angel’s love interest. All the characters, except Mark, have AIDS.

The story has been altered a bit to suit contemporary life. Puccini’s La Boheme was based in the late 1800’s. Larson rewrote the play and changed the characters to suit the state of affairs in the 1980’s. The character’s names and occupations were changed, yet are a reflection of the original characters. Mimi was a seamstress with tuberculosis in the original, and now is a dancer with AIDS. Rudolfo the poet has become Roger the musician and Marcello the painter is now Mark the filmmaker.

The story brings together people in love, like Mimi and Roger, Angel and Tom, and also Maureen and Joanne. But it also shows the reality that AIDS leads to death no matter what. Angel gets really sick as the play progresses and dies leaving behind a heartbroken Tom who professes his undying love at her funeral. At the end of the play, Mimi is found sick and delirious lying on the street by Maureen and Joanne who bring her to Roger’s apartment. She expresses her love to Roger who in turn sings her a song he had written inspired by her. After the song she turns limp and everyone believes her to be dead but after a while she wakes up again and claims she saw Angel telling her to turn back. Roger and Mimi are overjoyed at being able to find each other and everyone is reminded that it is important to live each day to the fullest as there is “no day but today”.

Directed by Michael Greif, ‘Rent’ has become a cult musical of sorts and getting tickets is no easy task. You could get your tickets directly from the box office at the Nederlander Theater, or book your tickets online or by phone.



Source by Al Terry

Time Value of Money

Life is about decisions, whether they relate to your work, business or personal life. Often ignored is the interplay between all these areas, and the fact that a little interdisciplinary thinking can go a long way. This might sound obtuse, but many important decisions can be made easier by thinking simply, and a bit differently.

Before we do, a note about value, and ‘utility’. Business is about creating value. Our personal lives (according to economists) are about maximizing our utility, where utility is simply a measure of the happiness or satisfaction gained from a good or service.

Think of it this way, and business is considered first. If shareholders (either owners or investors) could create more value themselves using other means, why bother running or investing in a business? Assuming we don’t all have a perpetual income stream it comes back to this – if you don’t create value in today’s economy, you’ll be forced to do one of two things. Change how you do things, or cease to exist. For business the value question is rather important.

People have it a little easier in some respects. Creating maximum utility is an incentive in and of itself. In the end, we all want more, whether it is revenue and growth for business, or old-fashioned utility in our personal lives.

To get more, we return to the decisions mentioned earlier, as all the decisions we make have a direct impact on both value creation and utility maximization, in particular those related to finance. Successful strategic management (the direction you want to take the business) is supported by your investment policy (choosing which projects to undertake) and your financing policy (how you fund everything). Linked to all of this is risk management, or how you handle the risks associated with these financial decisions.

Personally, financial decisions influence your quality of life, and your ability to enjoy the things you want. Once again we are back looking at the study of incentives – how people get what they want, or need, especially when other people want or need the same thing. In this case, it’s maximum utility.

One of the cornerstones of modern finance assists us in understanding which decisions to make, and it is equally applicable to business and personal finance. Its known as the time value of money. Simply put, $1 today is worth more to you than $1 received in the future. Why? Money has a time value because of interest rates, no matter how measly, making $1 today more valuable than $1 received at some time in the future because it can be invested today to provide a return. The income from the investment will in turn, make the dollar you get today worth more than the one promised you in the future. Perhaps an example best illustrates the point.

Anne is offered the choice between $100 now, and $100 in a year’s time. She takes the cash now, and invests it in a security (or bank) yielding 8%, and in a year has $108, which is clearly more than if she deferred taking the money at the start.

Again, this comes back to the incentives mentioned earlier. Interest rates are paid because someone else can use your money now, and they are prepared to pay you a return for the privilege of doing so, which is in truth a premium for taking the risk of giving your money to someone else. With business, this concept is part of what is known as the Sharpe-Lintner Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM for short), allowing people to work out, in today’s terms, the value of future cash flows on any project or decision requiring investment. Widely used, this concept varies in appearance and complexity, from sophisticated models developed by General Electric to the small business owner using the ‘NPV’ formula in an Excel spreadsheet.

There is another side to this discussion, and it’s slightly more personal. The time value of money can apply to you, and specifically, your utility. To understand how, we need to look at things the other way around and get a handle on the incentives of everyone involved.

Think of large personal assets you might have, like a structured settlement. The agreements reached in setting up the settlement left you with a sense of security for the future and continuing, dependable payments over time. Comfortable. Hmm. Let’s look at the incentives.

Think like they do. The illusion is that you will be better off down the track with the settlement. The problem is, they don’t want you to have all your money now because they understand the time value of money. Its worth more to them, and they bank on the fact that you haven’t given it a second thought.

Remember that structured settlements are designed so that the paying company get the maximum benefit from the time value of money. This doesn’t happen by accident or through some amazing act of benevolence driven by concern about your long term well-being. It’s pure market and negotiating power. Considering the time value of your settlement, the incentive is for them to keep your money as long as possible to maximize their value growth.

The intent of this discussion is to make you think. Consider the time value of money in your personal life. How much value is there for you in holding first-mortgage on a property for 20 years, compared with maximizing your utility? How much utility is your monthly settlement check going to provide you in 10 years? Just think about increases in the cost of living over the next fifteen years, and how the monthly check stands up.

Avenues exist in today’s marketplace for you to better utilize these high-value assets like structured settlements and real estate notes. Naturally, decisions to do so should not be taken lightly, treating your largest assets as whimsically as an ATM card. Whether in business or in your personal life, always consult a diverse range of industry professionals to increase the amount of information and knowledge brought to bear on any decision. As mentioned at the start, risk management is an important part of any decision making process.

Remember the time value of money. It can be used both for and against you. And find out which way it is being used, just look to which party has the larger incentives.



Source by Jeremy Ballenger

Integrated Marketing Communications – 5 Primary Communication Tools

Communication is always one of the most important and vital strategic areas of an organization’s success. You can have the best or most innovative products or services, but if your internal and external communications are weak, then the demand for your products or services raises a personal flag of concern. When communicating the value of your products or services, you want to focus on how they will benefit your clients.

When planning your strategy for Integrated Marketing Communication or IMC, you want to have dialogue with your customers by inviting interaction through the coordinated efforts of content, timing and delivery of your products or services. By ensuring direction, clarity, consistency, timing and appearance of your messages, conveyed to your targeted audience, these factors will help avoid any confusion about the benefits of your brand, through the connection of instant product recognition.

When looking at your marketing mix, you’re examining price, distribution, advertising and promotion, along with customer service. Integrated marketing communication is part of that marketing mix included in your marketing plan. IMC strategies define your target audience, establishes objectives and budgets, analyzes any social, competitive, cultural or technological issues, and conducts research to evaluate the effectiveness of your promotional strategies.

If companies are ethically planning, communicating, and following industry guidelines, they will most likely earn the trust of their customers and target audience. There are five basic tools of integrated marketing communication:

1. Advertising:

This tool can get your messages to large audiences efficiently through such avenues as radio, TV, Magazines, Newspapers (ROP), Internet, Billboards and other mobile technological communication devices. This method can efficiently reach a large number of consumers, although the costs may be somewhat expensive.

2. Sales Promotion:

This tool is used through coupons, contests, samples, premiums, demonstrations, displays or incentives. It is used to accelerate short-term sales, by building brand awareness and encouraging repeat buying.

3. Public Relations:

This integrated marketing communications tool is initiated through public appearances, news/press releases or event sponsorships, to build trust and goodwill by presenting the product, company or person in a positive light.

4. Direct Marketing:

This tool will utilized email, mail, catalogs, encourage direct responses to radio and TV, in order to reach targeted audiences to increase sales and test new products and alternate marketing tactics.

5. Personal Selling:

Setting sales appointments and meetings, home parties, making presentations and any type of one-to-one communication, to reach your customers and strengthen your relationship with your clients, initiate this IMC tool.

Decisions linking the overall objectives and strategies during the marketing planning phases help to evaluate and fine-tune the specific activities of integrated marketing communication. Before selecting an IMC tool, marketing, product and brand managers must look at social, competitive, legal, regulatory, ethics, cultural and technological considerations. One thing you want to avoid when activating the tools of integrated marketing communication is reaching inappropriate audiences and causing controversy. That could be damaging when trying to build brand awareness and encourage consumer spending with your company. When marketing managers examine the beliefs, emotions and behavior of their targeted audience towards their brand, they can influence their beliefs to achieve product awareness, by attracting attention to their promotional campaigns.



Source by Kym Gordon Moore

6 Creative Ways to Market Yourself As an Insurance Agent

Marketing yourself as a qualified insurance agent is one of the most important components to achieving success. For an agent, success is often measured by the number of clients who make a decision to buy the products and the services that you are offering to them. Proper marketing will help you increase your customer base, but you have to be creative about it in order to stand out from the rest of the agents whom you are competing against. Here are six clever and creative ways that you can make that happen.

Develop a client appreciation program.

When your clients feel like you appreciate their business, they will spread the word to their friends and family. Find a way to show your regular clients your appreciation (Thank You card periodically, free upgrade of service, etc.) and you’ll see your success grow.

Use direct mail.

Sending out postcards and letters to your current clients and potential leads will help expose your products and services to a wide audience. Don’t send out boring form letters, though. Be creative so you can get their attention.

Create a newsletter.

Newsletters are great ways to keep your clients up to date on the latest developments in the insurance industry. There may be new products on the market or important news that they will find interesting. Add a personal touch by adding something about your family or a special greeting. Send out the newsletter monthly or every other month, but be consistent about it either way.

Develop a website.

If you want to compete in today’s business world, it’s essential to have a website for your clients and potential leads to visit. However, it shouldn’t just be any website. You should hire a professional web designer to develop the website so it looks great. It’s also ideal to have a section of your site which explains the products and services that you offer as well as a link that customers can click on to get in contact with you.

Be responsive.

The quicker you respond to a client’s questions or a lead’s phone call, the more successful you will become. By responding quickly, you will show them that you appreciate their business rather than making them feel like a bother.

Publish articles online.

One way to market yourself as an insurance agent is by publishing relevant articles online. You can create a blog, post to ezines or other websites so you can get your name out there. When potential clients and existing customers do a Google search for your name, they will find all of the articles you have posted and they will be more likely to trust the information that you give them.

These are just a few of the ways you can market yourself as an insurance sales representative and increase your success as a result. Find a few agents in other areas who are successful and ask them for their secrets. If they don’t live in your area, they will be more likely to help because they won’t see you as a direct competitor.



Source by Daniel Hagy